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Dear GWUSPHHS: Here are some
questions for your investigation

October 27th, 2013 · 2 Comments · Critical thinking

The George Washington University School of Public Health office of communications is investigating the relationship between castration doc Mark Geier and an unnamed graduate student. The office left the following comment on this website and two others Friday afternoon:

The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services is still investigating the claims in this article. However, the article gives the impression that Mark Geier was teaching or advising a GW student who was doing a practicum at SPHHS. In fact, Mark Geier was facilitating the use of a non-GW database the student used while doing his/her research, which was not part of a practicum. The student in question was being supervised by a faculty member at the university and the student’s contact with Mark Geier was limited mainly to accessing the information in this database.

GW School of Public Health
Office of Communications

Investigating Geier is so 2007.  That’s when the Maryland state medical board received its first complaint about a Silver Spring geneticist who chemically castrates autistic children. Maryland suspended Geier’s license in April, 2011. Washington State followed a month later, and Virginia a month after that. California petitioned to revoke Geier’s license in August, 2011, about the same time the unnamed graduate student started studying for a two-year master’s of public health program. By the time said unnamed student graduated from SPHHS, Geier’s license had also been suspended or revoked in New Jersey, Kentucky, Texas, Indiana, Illinois, and Missouri.

So let’s all welcome yet another investigation of Mark Geier, and here’s hoping the SPHHS shares the results with the public health appreciating segment of the public. Here are some questions we hope to see answered:

  • Did Mark Geier submit a site preceptor application to SPHHS? If so, when?
  • Did the student do a practicum as part of her/his degree? If so, who was the site preceptor?
  • Did the student complete a master’s thesis? If so, what was Mark Geier’s role in that paper?
  • What is the nature of Geier’s database? Is it related to genetics (Geier is a geneticist genetic counselor,  by training and experience)? Or were Geier and his facilitated graduate student delving into data related to vaccine safety, an area unrelated to Geier’s skill set?

I’m sure the GWUSPHHS office of communications will be forthcoming with its investigation, and we look forward to further comments.

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2 responses so far ↓

  • 1 lilady // Oct 27, 2013 at 5:07 pm

    I’d like to clarify one of your statements about Mark Geier:

    “What is the nature of Geier’s database? Is it related to genetics (Geier is a geneticist by training and experience)? Or were Geier and his facilitated graduate student delving into data related to vaccine safety, an area unrelated to Geier’s skill set?”

    Mark Geier is not a “geneticist” or an “epidemiologist”, in spite of the false claims that he made to the Maryland Medical Licensing Board. He was certified as a “genetic counsellor”…not a geneticist.

    Geier never completed a medical geneticist post-doctoral fellowship and therefore was never certified as a geneticist by ABMG (The American Board of Medical Geneticists).

  • 2 lilady // Oct 27, 2013 at 8:36 pm

    Follow up to my post above, about Mark Geier lying about his credentials:

    http://leftbrainrightbrain.co.uk/2011/05/04/maryland-board-of-phyicians-mark-geier-endangers-autistic-children-and-exploits-their-parents/

    (Excerpted from the Maryland Medical Licensing Board-Order for Summary Suspension of Mark Geier’s Medical License)

    “….The Respondent, in addition to being a physician, is certified as a genetic counselor. His assessment and treatment of autistic children, as described herein, however, far exceeds his qualifications and expertise….”

    And,

    “….On November 6, 2007, in furtherance of the Board’s investigation, Board staff interviewed the Respondent. During the interview, the Respondent stated that he was a board-certified geneticist and a board-certified epidemiologist. The Respondent stated that he had been board-certified in epidemiology in 2007….”

    And,

    “….166. By letter dated March 29, 2011, the Respondent, through counsel, submitted to the Board a “Fellowship Certificate” from the American College of Epidemiology (“ACE”). The ACE is a professional association whose policy on admission is “inclusiveness.” An ACE fellow is not required to have a degree in epidemiology, a degree in a “related field” is sufficient.

    167. The Respondent knew, or reasonably should have known, that he was not board-certified in epidemiology….”

    And,

    “…..168. By letter dated March 29, 2011, the Respondent, through counsel, also submitted to the Board a certificate issued by the American Board of Medical Genetics on September 15, 1987 certifying the Respondent as a Genetic Counselor.

    169. The term “genetic counselor” is not synonymous with “geneticist.” A geneticist, or medical geneticist, is a physician who evaluates a patient for genetic conditions, which may include performing a physical examination and ordering tests. A genetic counselor is an individual with a masters degree who helps to educate the patient and provides an assessment of the risk of the condition recur in the family.

    170. The Respondent knew, or reasonably should have known, that he was not a board-certified geneticist….”

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